Category: News

Women’s Festival of Snooker: Tournament Information

The 2018 Women’s Festival of Snooker is now underway at the Northern Snooker Centre in Leeds, with five world titles to be decided over the next four days.

Event schedule

  • Friday 13 April – World Women’s Under-21 Championship / World Women’s Seniors Championship
  • Saturday 14 April – World Women’s 10-Red Championship
  • Sunday 15 April – World Women’s 6-Red Championship
  • Monday 16 April – World Women’s Pairs Championship

Match schedule

Draws and results

View the latest draws and results for each tournament via MySnookerStats HERE.

In action at the 2017 Paul Hunter Women's Classic

Doro Rapp Q&A

With less than one week to go until the start of the 2018 Festival of Women’s Snooker we caught up with Germany’s Dorothée Rapp to learn more about how she became interested in snooker and about her off-table passion for music…

Hi Doro, you will be returning to England to play at the Festival of Women’s Snooker next week. How much are you looking forward to this year’s event?

Yes, I am looking forward to it very much. It’s a great opportunity and challenge for me with interesting people and a great venue.

In action at the Paul Hunter Women’s Classic (August 2017) © Monique Limbos

How did you first become interested in snooker?

Many years back I went to play a bit of pool with friends now and then, purely for fun, in a place around the corner. There were two snooker tables too, but I always gave them a wide berth – they seemed so huge!

Then in 2013, almost accidentally I watched the World Championship in Sheffield on Eurosport and decided I finally needed to understand the basic rules. Somehow I got hooked, but by that time there was not a single snooker table left in my town (all British military personal being gone), but there was an open-door weekend in a club not too far away. I went, I tried a frame and that started it.

What is it that you enjoy about the game?

Apart from the colourful material and the huge table? 🙂 I guess I love that it’s fascinating over a long time, it’s never the same, you can work on many different aspects – and it’s fantastic when it – sometimes – works as planned.

Rather than being a fan of particular players, I like the twists and turns of long matches.

© Marco Borggreve

Away from snooker we know that you are also a talented musician – tell us a little about that…

The two go quite well together actually, but luckily I started playing the cello much earlier so it works the way it should more often!

Yes, I am a professional classical musician working full-time in a symphony orchestra. We play subscription concerts in the cities around here, we are also touring quite a bit in Germany and in Europe and we also have been to Japan and the USA twice on tour. We are around 75 people from about 15 different nationalities. We get to play with world class conductors and soloists, but we also play a great many concerts for and with school children.

As special project we also play opera. It is quite demanding and time consuming, especially since of course almost all evenings and weekends are worktime, but I love it.

In fact, last year during the Paul Hunter Women’s Classic you almost had to be in two places at once with both the snooker and a concert running during the same weekend…

True, that was a crazy schedule. To be able to play in the snooker tournaments I need a special permit, since of course the orchestra has to take holidays all at the same time – during the summer – and it takes some planning and goodwill from my section colleagues to be able to go away in mid-season, and it all depends on that no one calls in sick – in which case I would have to return immediately.

Last year I could play the morning match in Nuernberg, then I took a train to Fulda – about one hour away – of course the train was late, then a taxi to the concert venue. It was an open air gala, so everything was already fenced up. The taxi driver almost refused to take me there thinking it was all closed.

Then the security almost didn’t let me in because I was not arriving with the rest of the orchestra – but I made it just in time for the soundcheck and once seated I could relax!

Afterwards to a hotel – since no train was going that late at night – before next morning heading back to Fuerth to play snooker.

And back to the baize, why do you think women should play snooker and in particular our competitions?

Why not? When I started playing the cello it was still said to be unusual for a woman and some orchestras even did not accept them for the auditions. Times have changed 🙂

Doro will be competing in next weekend’s Seniors, Pairs, 10-Red and 6-Red World Championship tournaments at the season-ending Festival of Women’s Snooker at the Northern Snooker Centre in Leeds, England.

Entries remain open until tomorrow at 4:30pm BST, click HERE for more information and to enter.

On Yee Crowned ‘Best of the Best’ for Second Time

Newly crowned three-time world champion Ng On Yee has been named ‘Best of the Best’ for the second time at the Samsung Hong Kong Sports Stars Awards earlier this week.

Having previously won the prestigious award in 2015 following her maiden world title success, the 27-year-old again received the honour at the Convention and Exhibition Centre in recognition of her career-year 2017, which saw her claim five ranking event titles on the World Women’s Snooker Tour including her second world crown in Singapore last March.

On Yee told the South China Morning Post:

“Winning the World Championship in 2017 was a great moment for me. I had to play until the last shot in the final before beating my opponent, Vidya Pillai.

“Since winning the world title for the first time in 2015, I’ve become a more mature player. I have been playing in more tournaments all around the world. I have seen more young faces come up against me and they are finishing on the podium.

“I hope my success can help lift the sport and make it more popular in Hong Kong, for it is a sport that can be played by men and women, young and old.”

Crowned world number one for the first time earlier this year based on her results during the past two seasons, On Yee recently cemented her position at the top of the women’s game by claiming her third world title in Malta. The event represented her most dominant victory to date, as she overcame world class players including Belgium’s Wendy Jans and English duo Maria Catalano and Rebecca Kenna without the loss of a single frame in Malta.

Her victory also ensures that On Yee has qualified to play in the qualifying rounds of the professional World Championship in Sheffield next month, while she is also set to begin her defence of her world 6-Red and 10-Red titles at the Festival of Women’s Snooker in Leeds.

World Title Hat-Trick For Ng On Yee

Hong Kong’s Ng On Yee has defeated Maria Catalano 5-0 to complete the successful defence of her WLBS World Women’s Snooker Championship title and claim her third world crown overall on Saturday.

On Yee completed a dominant week in Malta with a convincing victory against world number four Catalano, who earlier in the day had stunned 11-time world champion Reanne Evans with a 4-3 win to progress to her fifth world final and first since 2013.

It was also a fifth final for On Yee, who last month became world number one for the first time in her career and following previous victories against Belgium’s Wendy Jans and third ranked Rebecca Kenna, routed Catalano to seal the title without the loss of a single frame.

The success sees On Yee become only the third player ever to win the title on three or more occasions, joining an elite group comprising Reanne Evans (11), Allison Fisher (7), Kelly Fisher (5) and Karen Corr (3).

The 27-year-old will also extend her lead at the top of the WLBS rankings when they are revised next week, while beaten finalist Catalano will rise one place to number three following her run.

A delighted On Yee later revealed that she came into the tournament carrying an illness, but that this could have actually worked to her advantage.

“I am absolutely over the moon to win my third title,” said On Yee. “I did not have great expectations coming into the tournament as I was coughing and sick so just tried to play every game, every ball. But looking back now I think that this took a lot of pressure off me and I started to play a little better.

“When I saw the knockout draw I thought that was a tough draw, playing Wendy Jans in the first knockout match, but I just tried to focus and to enjoy the games. I would like to say thank you to all of my team, including family and friends, as well as my coaches at the Hong Kong Sports Institute who have supported me even late at night.”

And having enjoyed her time at the tournament in Malta, the Asian star now turns her attention to Sheffield where she will compete at the professional World Championship qualifiers following her latest triumph.

“It has been great to be here in Malta for the first time with very nice weather, a beautiful ocean view for breakfast in the morning and to be surrounded by nice people.

“As well as the title, the most important thing for me is that I have now qualified to player at the professional World Championship in Sheffield which I am really looking forward to.

“The first time there when I played Peter Lines [in 2016] I was so nervous about the atmosphere that I did not play well. Last year against Nigel Bond I had more expectations, but I still didn’t play well, so hopefully this year I can just enjoy the match.”

The World Women’s Snooker Tour will return for its final event of the 2017/18 season with the Women’s Festival of Snooker, which runs from 13-16 April 2018. Entries for the event are still being accepted HERE.

World Women’s Snooker Championship: Draw Available

The group stage draw for the 2018 World Women’s Snooker Championship is now available.

Further information including playing format and schedule will be released as soon as possible.

The event will run from 14-17 March 2018 and forms part of the first ever World Snooker Federation Championships in Malta.

Snooker at Northern Snooker Centre

Festival Format Announced

The format has been announced for the 2018 Women’s Festival of Snooker which returns to the Northern Snooker Centre in Leeds, England this April.

The final event of this season’s World Women’s Snooker Tour will run from 13-16 April 2018 and feature five tournaments including the return of the 6 and 10 Red World Women’s Championship ranking events both won in 2017 by world number one Ng On Yee.

The Festival will begin with the World Women’s Under-21 Championship and World Seniors Championship events, claimed last year by Emma Parker and Emma Bonney.

Following the 6 and 10 red events, the four-day event will conclude with the World Women’s Pairs Championship, also won by Emma Bonney a year ago together with Vicky Shirley.

Full tournament schedule:

  • Friday 13 April – World Women’s Under-21 Championship / World Women’s Seniors Championship
  • Saturday 14 April – World Women’s 10-Red Championship
  • Sunday 15 April – World Women’s 6-Red Championship
  • Monday 16 April – World Women’s Pairs Championship

Due to the timing of the event which will be played concurrently with the qualifiers for the professional Betfred World Championship in Sheffield, we have taken the decision not to stage the World Mixed Pairs Championship as part of this year’s Festival. We do however intend for the event to return at a future date suitable for all.

The full tournament entry pack is now available and entries are being accepted HERE.

Nutcharut Wongharuthai Q&A

There was a familiar winner earlier this month at the WLBS British Open as 11-time world champion Reanne Evans claimed her latest title on the World Women’s Snooker Tour, but an unfamiliar runner-up as Thailand’s Nutcharut ‘Mink’ Wongharuthai reached her first WLBS final in Stourbridge.

The 18-year-old, who plays at and is supported by the Hi-End Snooker Club, made her WLBS debut at last year’s World Women’s Snooker Championship in Singapore, immediately showcasing her talent by compiling an event-high break of 90.

But it was not until this month that she could play her first WLBS event within the UK, at which she exceeded all expectations by defeating newly-crowned world number one Ng On Yee 4-2 in the semi-finals, before losing out to Evans in the tournament’s decisive match.

We recently caught up with Mink to look back at the tournament and learn more about a player described recently by world number three Rebecca Kenna as “definitely a top-five player in the world” notwithstanding her current world ranking of 32…

Congratulations on reaching your first WLBS final at the British Open earlier this month. How happy were you to make it that far?

As it was my first time participating in a WLBS tournament in the UK I was very happy to have made it to the final, although I lost to Reanne. She was a very deserving winner and I will continue to work even harder to achieve more.

You had a fantastic win against Ng On Yee in the semi-finals? Is she one of your idols in the game for what she has achieved for women’s snooker in Asia?

She definitely is. I believe that all of the women players in Asia look up to Ng On Yee as their role model for her wonderful achievements as an Asian player. She has done all of us Asian players proud.

You have now played Reanne Evans in Singapore and here, what makes her such a strong opponent?

To be frank, I feel that her reading and her play of the game is very different from us Asian players. Her break building technique especially is what I feel is very close to the men’s standard.

However, given ample time and practice, I hope to be like her in the near future.

Did you enjoy playing in the UK for the first time?

Yes. It was definitely a time worth spending in Stourbridge town with all of the lovely people around and working with organisers like the WLBS.

Do you plan to play in more WLBS events now?

Yes I hope I can play in more WLBS events in the future provided I am able to get more like-minded sponsors to help me along the way.

How did you become interested in playing snooker?

Well, I grew up in a snooker club as my mum used to be a cashier there. My dad loves snooker very much too and eventually I started playing and fell in love with this game at the age of 10-years-old.

We have seen on social media that you are referred to as ‘Mink’ in Thailand – why is that?

Normally in Thailand we call each and everyone by their nickname because our traditional Thai names are too long and we doesn’t have any Christian name like Western people. So we use nicknames instead.

For e.g. Noppon Saengkham [current top 64 player, who was in Stourbridge to watch Nutcharut] is known as Moo in Thailand. It is the same for me  as I am known as Mink.

Who are you favourite snooker players?

My favourite players include Ronnie O’Sullivan definitely, also Mark Selby, as well as Ding Junhui.

How big is snooker among women in Thailand?

There are a number of female players competing, among them four to five of them are of my level. So sometimes it’s quite competitive when it comes to selections.

I hope one day Thailand be the host for a world women’s event, so that more of them will be given the opportunity to compete with players around the world.

Malta next for the World Championship – how excited are you to play in the tournament?

I hope that day will come soon. I simply just love competing with different players around the world.

Nutcharut Wongharuthai plays snookerDo you have any other interests when not playing snooker, things you like to do for fun?

My other hobbies include watching TV and playing games, but I do spend most of my time practising snooker though!

And finally, you play at the Hi End Snooker Club in Thailand, how good is that venue?

It is beyond words that I can describe. Hi-End presently sponsor and support me. I feel so honoured to be able to practice in this club. It’s literally the most prestigious club in the whole of Thailand with top quality tables as well as equipment. If one were to take this sports seriously, Hi-End snooker club in definitely the place to practice in.

Nutcharut Wongharuthai will next be in action at this year’s World Women’s Snooker Championship, to be held as part of the inaugural World Snooker Federation Championships from 14-17 March 2018 in Malta.

Time Running Out to Enter World Women’s Championship

Time is running out to enter next month’s WLBS World Women’s Snooker Championship, to be staged at the Dolmen Hotel, Malta from 14-17 March.

Eligible players

  • The top 30 players on the current WLBS ranking list are eligible to be nominated by their National Federation (NF) to compete.
  • Each NF is able to nominate up to FOUR additional players to compete.
  • Only players representing National Federations who are members of the WSF by the event entry deadline of 1 March 2018 will be eligible to be nominated. This applies to ALL players who wish to compete in the tournament.

The top 30

The top 30 players following the British Open are:

  • Ng On Yee, Reanne Evans, Rebecca Kenna, Maria Catalano, Laura Evans, Katrina Wan, Suzie Opacic, Diana Schuler, Jenny Poulter, Tatjana Vasiljeva, So Man Yan, Aimee Benn, Shannon Metcalf, Stephanie Daughtery, Jaique Ip Wan In, Sharon Kaur, Emma Parker, Claire Edginton, Emma Bonney, Jodie Allen, Paula Judge, Diana Stateczny, Jeong Min Park, Michelle Brown, Ronda Sheldreck, Vicky Shirley, Heidi De Gruchy, Ho Yee Ki, Chu Pui Ying and Chloe White

IMPORTANT: If you are one of these players and wish to compete at the tournament, you MUST contact your NF as soon as possible to confirm your nomination for the tournament.

Additional nominations

In addition to the top 30 players, each NF which is a member of the WSF is eligible to nominate up to a further four players to compete in the tournament.

For the avoidance of doubt, players ranked within the top 30 will not count towards these four players. For example if all 17 English players currently inside the top 30 of the rankings were to play in Malta, England’s NF (EASB) would still be able to nominate a further four players.

If you are currently ranked outside of the top 30 and wish to compete at the tournament, we urge you to contact your NF as soon as possible for further information as to their selection criteria for nomination.

Entry deadline

The event entry deadline for nomination is 1 March 2018.

All entries for this tournament must be submitted through National Federations.

For further information and to download the tournament invitation letter and supporting documents click HERE.